Published on

Dr Miriam Stoppard’s health focus…

It may be good news that tooth problems in children have decreased since 2001 but I still find it depressing that a third of 12-year-olds have decayed, filled or missing teeth.

A report by the NHS Dental Epidemiology Programme found that the proportion of 12-year-olds with these problems has dropped from 37% in 2001 to 33% in 2008/09. But to me it’s just not good enough that a third of kids have bad teeth!

Levels varied up to four times between regions and while this could partly be down to a lack of tooth-strengthening fluoride in some water supplies, this overall level of decay shouldn’t be happening.

Last year, another report revealed that one-third of five-year-olds have similar dental issues. This suggests a lack of good care from the start.

Milk teeth are incredibly important for three reasons: they help kids learn to speak; they help them learn to eat; and they guide the mature teeth into the gums correctly so they grow straight.

Follow my five golden rules to make sure your child has the chance of strong, healthy teeth throughout life: Take vitamin D in pregnancy.

(1) A deficiency of this vitamin in pregnancy can put kids at risk of tooth decay later on. The Food Standards Agency recommends pregnant and breastfeeding women take a 10mcg supplement of vitamin D every day.

(2) Brush from day one. As soon as the first tooth appears, brush it twice a day with a small, soft brush. This gets kids used to brushing. When the full set is through, aim for two minutes a time. Wait at least half an hour after eating to avoid damaging the enamel, which is temporarily softened by acid in food. Supervise brushing up to age seven and remember they need to start flossing when the teeth begin to touch each other.

(3) Use fluoride toothpaste. Up to three, kids should use toothpaste with a fluoride level of at least 1000 parts per million and then 1350ppm-1500ppm.

(4) Stick to water. Up to two-years-old, avoid sweet drinks, including fruit juice. A baby bottle full of a sweet drink will soak their teeth in damaging sugar and acid. After age two, dilute with water and get them to use a straw.

(5) Make friends with the dentist. Get your kids comfortable with regular trips to the dental surgery from the age of two.

Source: mirror.co.uk.

Tags: , , ,

Recent news articles

New dentist Dr Philip Woods joins the team

Published on 25th February 2020

We are delighted that we have a new dentist, Dr Philip Woods joining us in April. Philip qualified from Newcastle Dental School in 2008. After…

Internal Tooth Whitening Case Study

Published on 7th February 2020

Here we have a interesting recent tooth whitening case completed by dentist Dr Michael Davies at FHDC. The new client had a failing root canal…

Are the Instagram generation putting their dental health at risk?

Published on 29th January 2020

A recent article in The Telegraph has suggested that a generation of people growing up on social media are putting their teeth and oral health…

dentist Christmas charity donation
St George’s Crypt at Christmas

Published on 24th December 2019

Once again this year FHDC’s Christmas charity donation has been given to St George’s Crypt, a charity in the City of Leeds, working with the…

Mouth Cancer Action Month

Published on 4th November 2019

The Oral Health Foundation is building up to this year’s Mouth Cancer Action Month by calling on everybody to be ‘mouthaware’. Taking place throughout November,…

Cosmetic Dentistry ‘Tweakments’

Published on 1st November 2019

A beautiful, natural looking smile is a wonderful thing but according to recent research by Mintel that suggests that circa a third of people living…

Subscribe for news and offers...